Community pleads to clean up suburb, stop illegal dumping

From Fairfield Advance. 

By Windsome Walker

ABANDONED vehicles, smashed car windows and dumped garbage have become part of the scenery in Justin St, Smithfield, and locals say enough is enough.

 

Businesses and residents have called on Fairfield City Council to address the matter after another large pile of waste appeared in the street last Monday. The rubbish was removed by the council on Saturday.

Businessman Aleks Lajovic said rubbish and vehicle dumping was an ongoing concern in Smithfield.

“This area has looked like this for four years. No one does anything about it and the council doesn't police it,” he said.

Silvio Siracusa, of Hi-Class Mechanical Repairs, expressed fears about asbestos and said dumping was worse than ever.

“Every month or two we get somebody dumping rubbish at the end of our street near the creek,” he said.

“We’re also seeing a lot of unregistered vehicles and it’s making it harder to park and causing accidents.”

Prospect state Labor MP Hugh McDermott slammed the area’s lack of upkeep.

“The people dumping vehicles and rubbish around Smithfield have no respect for our community,” he said. “If fines are issued and vehicles impounded, the people responsible will learn very quickly to stop breaking the law.”

Fairfield City Council is a part of the Western Sydney Regional Illegal Dumping Squad. A council spokesman said a special team that deals with illegal dumping had investigated nearly 3000 incidents in the past 12 months.

“The team also spends a significant number of hours patrolling,” he said.

The spokesman said council’s community enforcement officers in Smithfield were complying with existing NSW laws to remove abandoned vehicles with no identifiable owner.

Fairfield police aim to work with rangers to sticker cars during February.

A NSW Environment Protection Authority spokeswoman advised courts could enforce a maximum penalty of $5 million for a corporation, and up to seven years jail for an individual, if a dumping offence harms the environment.

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