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Tony Abbott’s $100 Million Broken Promise on Westmead Hostpital

Wednesday, 10 February 2016

The Abbott Government has broken its promise not to cut hospital funding by slashing funding for Westmead Hospital by $100 million.

Treasurer Joe Hockey also slashed $12 million in funding for St George Hospital, $10 million in funding for Nepean Hospital and $6 million for a new MRI at Mount Druitt Hospital.

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COMMUNITY OUTRAGE AT O'FARRELL DECISION TO DUMP RADIOACTIVE WASTE AT KEMPS CREEK

Wednesday, 10 February 2016

At a public meeting in Penrith last night, Western Sydney residents have expressed alarm at Barry O'Farrell's decision to dump 5000 tonnes of radioactive waste at Kemps Creek – a stunning breach of his promise before the 2011 election.

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Putting the customer back in front: How to make electricity prices cheaper

Wednesday, 10 February 2016


A new report from the Grattan Institute's Energy program, Putting the customer back in front: how to make electricity cheaper, presents a concrete set of proposals for substantially reducing the power bills of Australian households.

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O’Farrell Government’s Attacks and Cuts

Wednesday, 10 February 2016

Since taking office in March 2011, Barry O’Farrell and his Government have made a number of cuts to funding, jobs, workers’ rights and services. Here is an overview of what the workers of NSW have endured thus far.

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Challenges await Australia’s new Tax Commissioner

Wednesday, 10 February 2016

by Miranda Stewart

In January 2013, Mr Chris Jordan AO starts as Federal Commissioner of Taxation in charge of the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). He follows Mr Michael D’Ascenzo AO, who was not reappointed after his seven-year term.

Mr Jordan will be only the 12th Commissioner and only the second external appointment in the ATO’s history. All appointments have been male. The first Commissioner, George McKay, appointed from the New South Wales public service in 1910, seems to have died from overwork in 1917 after administering on a shoestring the federal land tax and income tax introduced in 1915 to help fund World War I. The next Commissioner, Robert Ewing, appointed an assistant commissioner to help. In his 22 year innings until 1939, Mr Ewing oversaw a new federal estate tax, payroll tax, and the turbulent time before World War II, when the federal government took over the income taxes of the States.

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Harnessing monopoly for the common good

Wednesday, 10 February 2016

by Karl Fitzgerald

All other things being equal, the owners of the earth have a comparative advantage over those in business or earning a wage. With $21 trillion hidden in global tax havens revealed this year (), and Starbucks, Amazon and Google being grilled in the UK Parliament this week, the need for a fairer tax system is growing.

The clamour for the expansion of the GST is at fever pitch here in Australia. What are the motivations behind this?

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Sharp rise in youth homelessness shatters stereotypes

Wednesday, 10 February 2016

by James Farrell

The number of Australians who were homeless on census night increased by 17% to 105,237 in the five years to August 2011. When adjusted for population growth, the increase the increase is still worryingly high, at around 8%. It’s clear we need a stronger commitment to address this significant social issue.

The census data, released this week by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), continues to shatter the stereotype of homelessness: the middle-aged alcoholic or drug-addicted man sleeping in a park.

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Royal Commission: abuse victims need to be helped, not just heard

Wednesday, 10 February 2016

by Michael Salter

There has been a great deal of focus on the role of a Royal Commission in delivering “justice” for victims of sexual abuse. Justice is a powerful, symbolic principle, and being listened to can be a moving and meaningful experience for survivors. My experience interviewing child abuse survivors suggests the opportunity to tell their story in a validating and comfortable environment can have a range of emotional benefits for them.

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Spotlight back on PPPs as BrisConnections falters

Wednesday, 10 February 2016

by Flavio Menezes

News that BrisConnections, which operate Brisbane’s Airport Link M7, has suspended trade on the ASX as it continues to talk with its debtors is likely to again lead to a debate about the role of Public-Private-Partnerships – or PPPs – in providing government infrastructure.

PPPs have been criticised in the wake of several high profile failures including Sydney’s cross-city tunnel, Brisbane’s Clem 7 tunnel and the consortium building the Ararat prison in Victoria, as well as the high cost to the public of PPPs undertaken in the 1980s and 1990s.

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Corby by-election: British Tories all talk on wind power

Wednesday, 10 February 2016

by Adam Corner

There are few cardinal sins in politics – but campaigning on behalf of your opponent has to be one of them. So when news broke this week that the British Conservative Party MP Chris Heaton Harris had boasted on camera of providing resources and support to an opposition anti-wind farm candidate in order to “cause some hassle”, it was widely expected that the axe would fall.

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