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Pages tagged "Immigration & Asylum Seekers"


Breivik court verdict: security lessons?

by Robert Lambert 

Now that the legal question of Anders Breivik’s sanity has been resolved it should be possible to focus more closely on his political motivation and the security lessons that arise from this case. This should help inform a debate about how best to tackle the growing problem of far right violence in Europe and the US

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The Far Right Takes Root in Europe

by Mariano Aguirre
 
Anders Behring Breivik’s attacks are part of a worrying trend in Europe: the far right’s rise within mainstream politics.

 

 
The bloodthirsty attacks perpetrated by Anders Behring Breivik in Norway on July 22 last year (leaving 77 dead) provided a brutal awakening for all those in Europe who had been passively observing the rise of the Islamophobic far right. As the trial opens, around thirty political parties that openly call for a "pure European identity" are effectively in the process of consolidating their parliamentary positions (occasionally even signing agreements with mainstream right wing parties, as is the case in the Netherlands), and are claiming an ever greater media presence.
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What Welfare Entitlements do Asylum Seekers receive?

There is no truth to the claims that asylum seekers and refugees receive more in Centrelink benefits than old-age pensioners, or any other member of Australian society. Asylum seekers are not eligible to receive Centrelink benefits   while their asylum claims are being processed, although a small number of community-based asylum seekers receive  financial assistance through the Asylum Seeker Assistance Scheme, which is funded by The Department of   Immigration and Citizenship (DIAC). The payment rate for eligible asylum seekers under this scheme is $230 a fortnight less than the Aged Pension.

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The Precariat – The new dangerous class

by Guy Standing

For the first time in history, the mainstream left has no progressive agenda. It has forgotten a basic principle. Every progressive political movement has been built on the anger, needs and aspirations of the emerging major class. Today that class is the precariat.

So far, the precariat in Europe has been mostly engaged in EuroMayDay parades and loosely organised protests. But this is changing rapidly, as events in Spain and Greece are showing, following on the precariat-led uprisings in the middle-east. Remember that welfare states were built only when the working class mobilised through collective action to demand the relevant policies and institutions. The precariat is busy defining its demands.

The precariat has emerged from the liberalisation that underpinned globalisation. Politicians should beware. It is a new dangerous class, not yet what Karl Marx would have described as a class-for-itself, but a class-in-the-making, internally divided into angry and bitter factions.

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Let's not revive the ill-conceived Pacific Solution

By James Dunn

The High Court's decision on the sending of asylum seekers to Malaysia has apparently brought a welcome end to an ill-conceived and mismanaged policy. It cut across our commitment to international human rights, and is endangering the Gillard government. The Court's position is a welcome change to Australia's political commitment to these humanitarian standards inspired by the Universal Declaration proclaimed in 1948 which has been uncertain and uneven, contrary to the boast of our politicians in international forums. In the circumstances it is encouraging that the risks involved in the Malaysian solution were apparently too serious for our High Court judges to let it pass. The judgement should also make it impossible for the Government to consider the Nauru Pacific Solution that Mr. Abbott regrettably continues to brandish.

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For Labor's asylum seekers policy, there's only one solution

By Mick Power

How should the Gillard Government react to their latest challenge, delivered this time by the High Court's judgment on the Malaysia Solution? In the tight spot they're already in, sitting on a 27% primary vote and staring down a difficult fight on the carbon price, what to do about this latest policy dilemma?

The right thing, of course. Right now, there's nothing else they can do.

Saturday's headlines reported Tony Abbott calling Gillard to join him in a bipartisan return to the Pacific Solution, processing asylum seekers on Nauru and Manus Island. Some unnamed Labor backbenchers have even gone so far as to suggest that a return to temporary protection visas is the way forward.

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Legal challenge to the Malaysian solution

by Jo Coghlan

The Malaysian Solution is not a solution for anyone: especially children. High Court Justice Kenneth Hayne has granted a temporary injunction against the Gillard governments from processing recently arrive asylum seekers to Malaysia under the agreement referred to as the ‘Malaysian solution’.

The Malaysian Solution is an agreement between the governments of Australia and Malaysia that expels from Australia to Malaysia 800 asylum seekers who have arrived in Australia by boat in return for 4000 refugees from Malaysia over the next four years. The arrangement is part of the Regional Cooperation Framework established at the Bali Process Ministerial Conference in 2011. The Gillard government’s rational is that the arrangement: “demonstrates the resolve of Australia and Malaysia to break the people smugglers’ business model, stop them profiting from human misery, and stop people risking their lives at sea.” The cost, to be paid by Australia, is estimated at $216 million plus $76 million to fly the asylum seekers to Malaysia.

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Why Should Rioting Young People Listen to the Elites and Mind a Social Order that Disempowers Them?

 

by Michelle Chen

There's no simple explanation for the uprising in London and several other UK cities in the last week. But the riots mirror the state of working-class Britain.

 

After witnessing several nights of turmoil, the people of the United Kingdom are still trying to comprehend what just happened. There's no simple explanation for this apparently leaderless and rudderless uprising in London and several other cities. But amid the grim ashes and street clashes, the message of rage has seared itself into the public consciousness, rekindling an age-old tinderbox of class warfare.

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Extreme Desperation: Why Oslo Killer Targeted Young Labor Leaders

Last Friday, Anders Behring Breivik allegedly detonated a car bomb in Oslo’s government quarter before disguising himself as a policeman and carrying out a deadly shooting spree on the island of Utøya. The mass shooting claimed 68 additional lives, an act of violence apparently motivated by the shooter’s hatred of immigration and multiculturalism. Witnesses describe him as methodical, relishing his short-lived power as he shot teenagers who averaged16 years of age.

Breivik’s decision to target a conference for progressive youth, not the immigrants he hated, was no mistake. And if there is a silver lining to the tragedy, it is that it was an act of desperation.

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Immigration reform Obama style

by Jo Coghlan

America has more than 11 million (and as possibly as high as 20 million) people living inside its borders who do not have legal status. They account for 3.7% of America’s population. For American President Barrack Obama, immigration is the political elephant in the room particularly as he faces re-election next year. Recently Obama has significant speeches on immigration ‘reform’ but it is domestic politics that is driving his policies.

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