Hugh McDermott for Prospect

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Pages tagged "Workplace Relations"


O’Farrell Government’s Attacks and Cuts

Since taking office in March 2011, Barry O’Farrell and his Government have made a number of cuts to funding, jobs, workers’ rights and services. Here is an overview of what the workers of NSW have endured thus far.

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The power of control and reducing stress at work

For many, work means stress and as we all know, too much stress can lead to ill health. But research showing that people in positions of power are not very stressed, may hold clues for how workplaces can help reduce stress for all employees.

The difficult economic climate means many of us are being asked to “do more with less”, adding to the costs associated with the stress this creates. A critical challenge facing organisations then, is how to help employees effectively manage their stress, while maintaining optimal levels of performance and engagement.

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Top 10 actions showing the O'Farrell Government cannot be trusted

This month will be 12 months since the election of the O'Farrell government.

These are the top 10 actions that have demonstrated to me why the O'Farrell government cares little for the most vulnerable and cannot be trusted:

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Decent Work 2.0

by Frank Hoffer

Last month, Juan Somavia, the long serving Director-General of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) announced his departure in 2012.

As head of the ILO, he introduced the Decent Work Agenda in 1999 to re-focus the ILO and make it relevant for the 21st century. Twelve years later, the concept of ‘Decent Work’ is firmly established in the global debate and as an objective of national policy. It appears in many documents of the multilateral system, the G20 and national policy fora. It generates millions of Google hits. It is the subject of much academic research and debate. It is enshrined in several ILO Conventions and Declarations, and the international trade union movement introduced the annual Decent Work Day to campaign for workers’ rights. ‘Decent Work’ is so ubiquitous in ILO documents that some cynics say: “Decent Work is the answer, whatever the question!”

Will Decent Work survive the departure of the Director-General who coined the term and so successfully marketed it? Should it survive? The answer to the former question is one of the unknowns of “Realpolitik”. The answer to the latter depends on the assessment of what Decent Work means and how it should evolve.

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Innovation for the Public Good: Developing a Plan to Change Agency Culture

by Jitinder Kohli

Planning Is the Fifth and Final Ingredient to Promoting a Culture of Innovation in Government Agencies

As this series has shown, many public-sector agencies around the globe are working hard to create a culture of innovation. Leadership, finance, permeability, and incentives are all key ingredients to doing so. Today we cover the final ingredient: a plan to promote innovation.

Plans should start with a clear sense of where innovation is most needed in an agency’s work and how it will measure progress. They should explore needs across the system in a policy area, not just in the particular work of an agency (for example, by looking at schools or hospitals). And plans often need to combine strategies that develop specialized capacity for innovation with broader actions that change agencywide cultures.

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The Price of 9/11

By Joseph Stiglitz

The September 11, 2001, terror attacks by Al Qaeda were meant to harm the United States, and they did, but in ways that Osama bin Laden probably never imagined. President George W. Bush’s response to the attacks compromised America’s basic principles, undermined its economy, and weakened its security.

The attack on Afghanistan that followed the 9/11 attacks was understandable, but the subsequent invasion of Iraq was entirely unconnected to Al Qaeda – as much as Bush tried to establish a link. That war of choice quickly became very expensive – orders of magnitude beyond the $60 billion claimed at the beginning – as colossal incompetence met dishonest misrepresentation.

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100 days of Barry O'Fail.

By: John Robertson

Premier O'Farrell has spent his first 100 days in Government doing everything he said he wouldn’t – attacking worker rights, proposing retrospective legislation and avoiding independent scrutiny.

Opposition Leader John Robertson marked the Government's first 100 days at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital with nurses whose wages and conditions are under threat from the Premier's unprecedented workplace laws.

"It has been 100 days of failures from the O'Farrell Government," Opposition Leader John Robertson said.

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The Five Smartest US Congressional Bills You've Never Heard Of

by Ryan Rafaty

During any given Congressional term, literally thousands of proposals never make it past the committee stage of the legislative process. In recent years, less than 5 percent of all bills introduced ultimately became law. The scope of proposals in Congress garnering considerable media attention is similarly narrow. The pieces of legislation that attract the most publicity from the beltway media—like Paul Ryan’s radically unpopular plan to scrap Medicare—tend to drown out more sensible ideas that hardly stand any chance of enactment without public pressure on lawmakers to move the agenda forward.

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The Need for a UN Mechanism to Enforce International Labour Law Standards

 

 

by Hugh McDermott

Globalisation is an important and vital element of the new world economy.  Not only does it allow companies to access competitively priced labour markets, it redistributes employment opportunities and can provide significant economic benefits to workers in emerging markets.

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